Schedule of Readings & Discussions

 
Tuesday, March 29
What is Ecology?

    Separation: From the Shallow to the Deep

    Thursday, March 31
    The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis

    1. Lynn White, Jr., “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” Science 155/3767 (March 10, 1967), pp. 1203-1207. <pdf link>
    Tuesday, April 5
    On the Cult of the Factish Gods

    1. Bruno Latour, “On the Cult of the Factish Gods,” On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods trans. by Heather MacLean and Cathy Porter (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010), pp. 1-16. <pdf link>
    2. Val Plumwood, “The Ecological Crisis of Reason,” Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason (New York: Routledge, 2002), pp. 13-22. <pdf link>
    Thursday, April 7
    Ecopedagogy

    1. David W. Orr, Earth in Mind: On Education, Environment and the Human Prospect (Washington, DC: Island Press, 2004), pp. 7-25. <pdf link>
    2. Dolores LaChapelle, “Educating For Deep Ecology,” The Journal of Experiential Education 14/3 (November 1991), pp. 18-22. <pdf link>
    3. Bert Horwood, “Tasting the Berries:Deep Ecology and Experiential Education,” The Journal of Experiential Education 14/3 (November 1991), pp. 23-26. <pdf link>
    4. Peter Reason, “Wilderness Experience in Education for Ecology,” in Michael Reynolds and Russ Vince, eds., The Handbook of Experiential Learning and Management Education (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 187-195. <pdf link>
    Tuesday, April 12
    Ecological Vision

    class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove, at coordinates 32.884394, -117.237003

    1. James J. Gibson, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception (New York: Psychology Press, 1978), pp. 1-19, 22-33, 100-101, 127-143, 238-263. <pdf link>

    Liminality: Deep Ecology

    Thursday, April 14
    On The Deepness of Deep Ecology

    1. Bill Devall, Simple in Means, Rich in Ends: Practicing Deep Ecology (Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith, 1988), p. 33. <pdf link>
    2. Arne Naess, “The Deep Ecology Movement: Some Philosophical Aspects,” in The Selected Works of Arne Naess, volume X (Springer Netherlands, 2005), pp. 37-55. <pdf link>
    3. Arne Naess, “The Apron Diagram,” in The Selected Works of Arne Naess, pp. 75-81. <pdf link>
    4. Arne Naess, “Deepness of Questions and the Deep Ecology Movement,” in The Selected Works of Arne Naess, pp. 21-31. <pdf link>
    Tuesday, April 19
    The Ecological Self

    1. Arne Naess, “Self-Realization” in Thinking Like a Mountain, pp. 19-30. <book>
    2. Bill Devall, “The Ecological Self,” in Simple in Means, Rich in Ends, pp. 38-72.<pdf link>
    3. Gary Snyder, “Reinhabitation,” Manoa 25/1 (2013), pp. 44-48. <pdf link>
    Thursday, April 21
    Biocentrism

    1. Paul W. Tylor, “The Biocentric Outlook on Nature,” Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986), pp. 99-100. <pdf link>
    2. Thinking Like a Mountain, pp. 2-17, 32-77. <book>
    3. Dogen, “Mountains and Waters Sutra,” in Stephanie Kaza and Kenneth Kraft, eds., Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism (Boston: Shambhala, 2000), pp. 65-76. <pdf link>

    Liminality: Deep Phenomenology

    Tuesday, April 26
    Becoming Animal 1

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove, at coordinates 32.884394, -117.237003 <map>

    1. David Abram, Becoming Animal, pp. 3-80. <book>
    Thursday, April 28
    Becoming Animal 2

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove, at coordinates 32.884394, -117.237003 <map>

    1. David Abram, Becoming Animal, pp. 81-158. <book>
    Tuesday, May 3
    Becoming Animal 3

      class will meet in the classroom

    1. David Abram, Becoming Animal, pp. 159-258. <book>
    Thursday, May 5
    Becoming Animal 4

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove, at coordinates 32.884394, -117.237003 <map>

    1. David Abram, Becoming Animal, pp. 259-310. <book>

    Liminality: Deep Participation

    Tuesday, May 10
    Core Shamanism

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove. please bring something that you can lie down on.

    1. Michael Harner, “What is a Shaman?,” in Gary Doore, ed., Shaman’s Path: Healing, Personal Growth, & Empowerment (Boston: Shambhala, 1988), pp. 7-15. <pdf link>
    2. Susan Mokelke, “Core Shamanism and Daily Life,” Shamanism Annual 22 (2009), pp. 23-25. <pdf link>
    3. Gary Snyder, “The Wilderness” Turtle Island (New York: New Directions, 1974), pp. 106-110. <pdf link>
    4. Thinking Like a Mountain, pp. 79-90. <book>
      • As you read Thinking Like a Mountain, keep in mind the animal or natural feature you will represent in our Council of All Beings. Think about what you will might in Council. Plan to create a mask and/or costume as appropriate.
    Thursday, May 12
    A Council of All Beings

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove

    1. Thinking Like a Mountain, pp. 79-116. <book>

    Reintegration: Deep Justice

    Tuesday, May 17
    Social Ecology vs. Deep Ecology 1

      This is the changed assignment:

      As we begin the third major section of the course, we will shift focus to the practical implications of Deep Ecology’s deep questioning. Originally, I had assigned readings that probe the relationship between environmental justice and social justice. The syllabus did this from two perspectives: Third World critiques of Deep Ecology as an expression of Western privilege, and Ecofeminist critiques of Deep Ecology as patriarchal.

      Both critiques are important and would have led to stimulating conversations. Given that we are in the midst of a presidential election cycle, however, I will try a different approach.

      I would like you to go onto the Internet and research the tensions between social ecology and deep ecology in contemporary political discourse. Ask yourself, in an era of global climate change, what are the political tensions between anthropocentrism and biocentrism, and how can those tensions be mediated or resolved? Reread the 8 principles of Deep Ecology. Reconsider the Apron Diagram. Think about what makes Deep Ecology deep, and how it differs from “shallow ecology.” Then spend a few hours surfing the web, exploring online newspapers, blogs, and so on, exploring how those values and priorities are championed or rejected in contemporary American politics.

      You are not limited to the presidential candidates, but their positions and promises are a good starting point for your investigation.

        These are the original readings before I changed the class assignment:

      1. Kirkpatrick Sale, “Deep Ecology and Its Critics,” The Nation (May 14, 1998), pp. 670-675. <pdf link>
      2. Murray Bookchin, “Social Ecology versus Deep Ecology: A Challenge for the Ecology Movement,” in Nina Witoszek and Andrew Brennan, eds., Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Ecophilosophy (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999), pp. 281-301. <pdf link>
      3. Ramaehandra Guha, “Radical American Environmentalism and Wilderness Preservation: A Third World Critique,” Environmental Ethics 11/2 (Spring 1989), pp. 71-83. <pdf link>
      4. Arne Naess, “Comments on Guha’s ‘Radical American Environmentalism and Wilderness Preservation: A Third World Critique,’ in Philosophical Dialogues, pp. 325-333. <pdf link>
    Thursday, May 19
    The Case of Ecofeminism

    1. Ariel Kay Salleh, “Deeper than Deep Ecology: The Eco-Feminist Connection,” Environmental Ethics 6 (Winter 1984), pp. 339-345. <pdf link>
    2. Karen Warren, “Ecofeminist Philosophy and Deep Ecology,” in Philosophical Dialogues, pp. 255-269. <pdf link>
    3. Arne Naess, “The Ecofeminism versus Deep Ecology Debate,” in Philosophical Dialogues, pp. 270-273. <pdf link>
    4. Patsy Halen, “The Ecofeminism-Deep Ecology Dialogue: A Short Commentary on the Exchange Between Karen Warren and Arne Naess,” in Philosophical Dialogues, pp. 274-280. <pdf link>

    Reintegration: Deep Action

    Tuesday, May 24
    Reconnecting

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove

    1. Joanna Macy and Molly Brown, Coming Back to Life, pp. 63-103. <book>
    Thursday, May 26
    Opening

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove

    1. Coming Back to Life, pp. 105-167. <book>
    Tuesday, May 31
    Responding

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove

    1. Coming Back to Life, pp. 169-216. <book>

    Reintegration : From the Deep to the Shallow

    Thursday, June 2
    From EcoSpirituality to Uncivilization

      weather permitting, class will meet in the Eucalyptus Grove

    1. “Uncivilisation: The Dark Mountain Manifesto” <html link> / <pdf link>
    2. review: Lynn White, Jr., “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” Science 155/3767 (March 10, 1967), pp. 1203-1207. <pdf link>
        !! Please remember to CAPE this course. !!
        !! Please remember to CAPE this course. !!

        . . . yes, it’s that important